Historic Homes


Hartsville has many old homes that are filled with history and legends. Any visitor in search of some remnant or story from a time gone will certainly find it here. Not only are some of the homes pictured here listed on Tennessee's historic register, but also hold fascinating tales from long ago.

 

The Herod House
Built in 1832, this early Hartsville home stood on the way to Averitt's Ferry. The home had a panoramic view of the Battle of Hartsville. Troops were camped in the home's yard during the Yankee occupation of the town. Blood stains on the floor of a downstairs bedroom support the belief that wounded soldiers were kept here following the battle. The home was purchased by Wade and Victoria Herod in January of 1900. Today, Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Carnahan are the occupants, having done extensive restoration and reconstruction to this county landmark. Mrs. Carnahan is the granddaughter of Wade and Victoria Herod. The house is on the National Register of Historic Places.

The DeBow Home
One of the oldest homes in the city limits, this house was occupied by the DeBow family around 1805. The original portion of the home is log. When Confederates rode through town in 1862, Eva DeBow, the 13th child of the family and very young at the time, sat on the rock wall out front and watched them ride by. For many year, the J.C. Bradshaw family owned and lived in this house.

 
The Cunningham Home
Another of the few remaining old brick homes in Hartsville is the James Cunningham residence. It has been occupied by the Cunningham family since the 1920s. The Cunninghams ran a dry goods business on the square for many years. Mr. Cunnigham's grandfather stood guard over captured Union soldiers at the Hager's Hardware building following the Battle of Hartsville.
Lauderdale House
Located on Old Halltown Road, the Lauderdale home was built in the 1840s by James Hart Lauderdale, whose maternal grandfather was James Hart, the founder of Hartsville. The original portion of the house is log. It stayed in the Lauderdale family for the next 129 years. Following the death of Brevard "Gravy" Lauderdale, it was sold to someone outside the family. It was a member of this Lauderdale family for whom Fort Lauderdale, Florida was named. Today, the home has been restored, well kept and maintained, and is owned by Robert and Elizabeth Dusang.
The Miller Home
Built around 1850 with brick fired on the place, the Miller house has a full basement lined with quarried limestone blocks. For many years, this was considered one of Hartsville's show places. The house fell into decline in the 1950s and was unoccupied for many years. Recently, it has been purchased by Mr. and Mrs. Riley Greer who are restoring the home and grounds to their original charm and grace.
William "Billy" Rickman Home
On Honeysuckle Lane in the Willard Community sits the brick home of Mr. and Mrs. Billy Rickman. The home's walls are several bricks thick. It was constructed around 1850 by Dr. Siddon. In the 1870s, it was purchased by John Woods. It has been occupied continuously by the Woods and Rickman families since that time.
The Parker Home
Built of cedar logs in the early 1800s, the main portion of this house is now weather boarded. With its location at the corners of Highway 25 and Broadway, it has long been a Hartsville landmark. For many years it was the home of Mr. Addison Jones. It became the home of Mr. and Mrs. E.J. Parker, Sr. At present, it houses Tully's Bistro, a fine dining and catering facility owned and operated by Tully Wilson, which was opened on April 15, 2007.
The Turney-Hutchins Home
This home was built in 1788 by Henry Turney. In 1797, it was sold to Samuel Mitchell and in 1798 was sold to Captain William Alexander, whose daughter, Mary Brandon Alexander, married General William Hall (who became Governor in 1829). Future President Andrew Jackson, a close family friend, attended the wedding. Other owners of this home include John Hutchin, John Darwin and his grandson, and Joe Rickman. The present owners are Mr. and Mrs. Harry McCarl. The house is on the National Register of Historic Places.